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SST

I worked for Intel from 1995-2004 in Fab15 and Fab20. Constructive Confrontation does work when there is mutual respect and maturity between the conflicting parties. Intel lost it's culture during the transition to the Ronler Acres site. The focus became cost savings and personal development courses were no longer seen as value added. This created a wave of new hires that were never assimilated into the Intel culture and thus began the transformation. At Fab15, Engineer's/Op's Manager's and SST's worked together as one unit and created "The Best Fab on The Planet". It was truly a "Great Place to Work". During the transformation to Ronler Acres, upper management decided to hire New College Graduates to run their fabs rather than promote the personnel who ran the equipment for years and were the real experts. This new wave of Engineer's/Op's Manager's were the epitome of what's happened to the USA. They came in and were concerned with one thing, themselves! They came in with their mouths wide open and their ears and eyes shut. Clearly displaying their ignorance and displaying an air of entitlement. They didn't embrace the SST's and treated them like second class citizens. Constructive Confrontation was no longer a valuable tool because the SST's became resentful and distrustful of management and the Engineer's/Ops manager's no longer respected the input from the "equipment experts". The result was poor quality and constant struggles with equipment and processes. Shortly before I decided to leave Intel, I spoke with my manager about these trust issues and the answer's I received were "I got to feed my family, so I got to do what I got to do" and "we pay you to put up with this". I had enough of the nonsense at that point and moved on. Much happier now.

JenK

I am an engineer who worked for Intel from 96 to 98 and I thought the constructive confrontation concept was great. It most certainly did not give assholes the right to be assholes... the whole point was to be "constructive", hence the title.

At that time, one of the main concepts of the Intel culture was that everyone was equal. There was great emphasis on the team concept and management consistently claimed there was no hierarchy of power. Obviously, that's not reality, however the behavior really did reflect equality at that time. It seems to me, the problem does not lie with the constructive confrontation concept... It lies instead with the abandonment of the equality concept.

TonyG

I just started reading the book about the "No AssHole Rule".

Great statement,

we must overcome this history because we must have the positive results of creative, collaborative discussions of conflicting views by intelligent, well meaning individuals

and the question from JMG3Y:

So in re-launching this group as a new team rather than a dysfunctional group, what should we put to paper for ground rules (and what should we do)?

I can only say that i was once one of those assholes that thought that I was entitled.

The people I worked for cared enough to re-educate me in a way that cured me from that arrogant attitude of entitlement.

They Fired me!

Sometimes words on paper is not enough.

Wally Bock

There is a "business macho" culture in some companies that values tough talk and confrontation. When you hang around people who come from those cultures, they tell stories about put-downs, rudeness and such in the way that other companies tell customer service stories. Those cultures grow assholes. This is all passed off as "candor" or realism or truth telling but it gives license to jerks to act jerklike.

JMG3Y

Any suggestions for what to incorporate into the ground rules of a re-orienting, self-directed team to stimulate the necessary creative conflict but squelch the a**hole behavior? Previous (and unfortunately consistent) behavior by some group members led many to retreat to silence and distrust, which was tolerated by the administrators and the culture. Now having been given a new charge (you gotta fix this among yourselves), we must overcome this history because we must have the positive results of creative, collaborative discussions of conflicting views by intelligent, well meaning individuals. So in relaunching this group as a new team rather than a dysfunctional group, what should we put to paper for ground rules (and what should we do)?

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