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Ria Wallace

This is all very interesting. I actually found this while searching for answers to how children can have a low IQ yet perform above their IQ level.
I believe that "Standard Tests" do not accurately reflect one's true capibility either.
I will read these books to further the interest that you have unlocked. Thank you!

rajagopal sukumar

Prof. Sutton, I read this piece in your brilliant book Hard Facts as well.

I have long believed that IQ changes over time.

The other angle that you may want to cover is look at neuroscience.

Sharon Begley wrote an interesting book recently that proves with reams of evidence that the brain is malleable and it changes with time. If it is changing and forming new connections, IQ which is a function of connections in your brain, has got to change, right.

I wrote a review of this book recently available at this link.
http://sastwingees.blogharbor.com/blog/_archives/2007/7/1/3062595.html

dblwyo

Interesting, fascinating and helpful. Thanks for posting and drawing our attention. Forced me to re-examine my own thinking as well as my approach to people development. My implicit view has been that intelligence is roughly given but doing something with it takes a lot of hard work, nurturing and exposure/experience. And that one accumulates knowledge, if not wisdom, that allows one to be a lot "smarter" than someone more gifted by training your mind in habits of thought. Not sure if that's consistent with the theory and data or not but it seems to work.

Geoff

I have long believed intelligence to be malleable.

The question that has always troubled me in the workplace is related to personality. Which is more difficult: helping a committed student raise their SAT scores by 100 points or teaching a committed asshole not to be one?

David B. Bohl at SlowDownFAST.com

Professor Sutton,

Fascinating research. Thank you for highlighting it.

I may or may not be smart, but I believe that it comes down to willingness - a willingness to learn and grow. What that means to me is that I have to do all that I can to remain teachable. It starts with realizing the old cliché: the more I learn, the less I know. Great things happen from there.

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