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Chris Young

Leadership lessons (both good and bad) abound from this amazing story! I have included your post in my Rainmaker 'Fab Five' blog picks of the week (found here: http://www.maximizepossibility.com/employee_retention/2010/10/the-rainmaker-fab-five-blog-picks-of-the-week.html) to share your thoughts on this story with my readers so they too can learn from the leadership lessons of Luis.

Be well!

Ben

If this accident had happened in the US, these guys would have been dead a long time ago and their bodies would have been left down in the mines.
The environment in the US is already bad for employees, any compassion, devoid of any humanity, lacking in understanding the human "psyche", the management community is going backwards, instead of moving forward with Human relations, it sees and views employees like the machines and equipment it uese. The "ignorance" of knowing how to manage and basically knowing what management is all about is increasing by leaps and bounds, as employers seek to ingratiate themselves to "higher-ups" regardless of whether their decisions is good for business or even makes sense, or, is cognizant of employee involvement, contributions, values etc.
Perhaps we need to go back to the days when employees were represented by the Personnel department, rather than by Human resources; it does appear that employees are being looked at as "units of property" rather than as human beings with the ability to think.

William Cunningham

I used to work under someone that did the exact opposite of what you talk about here. He made everything regarding the future of my job ambiguous, refused to clarify anything, took as much control out of our hands as possible by going against any of our decisions (even if the decisions were made using a precedence set by him), and showed that he did not care as long as he got his paycheck. It made the workplace stressful and unbearable. I wish he had followed your guidance. Thank you for the insight!

Figlesias

I watched you interview on CNN. This is agreat angle to the miners experience that deserves more study. I´ve been on emergency situations as a trained recuer and believme its not an easy task to have people to follow you on such situations. So, this is a story of leadership, hope and survival some of the elements most needed today for our day to day activities as individuals and as a society. Your article its a great start, I hope you´ll elaborate more on this matter.

Ethics Sage

Your guidelines to help bosses perform at a high level are excellent but I would add one more -- consequences. Bosses should consider the consequences of their actions on stakeholders who may be affected by the decision made with respect to how best to deal with troublesome employees.

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