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Danny DeMichele Entrepreneur

I'm partial to this team bonding issue and I feel that it's a terrific tonic to giving up the spirits of players. Thanks for the article and well written.

Gary Cohen

Firstly, David, the question of the chicken or the egg was solved this year by some researchers in England. It was the chicken!

As for the issue around touching, this seems to be supported by the recent work of Barbara Hudson on positivity. And how it can become an upward spiral in organizations!

Jeremy's Bingo Room

Greetings to everyone, I'm not so much a basketball fan as much as I am a lover all sports. I particularly enjoy Cricket and Rugby - coming from England and I'm particularly drawn to the fortunes of Manchester United FC. But what I have noted - in all sports - is that the bonding that goes on between team mates is imperative to improving playing performance. I know from my days as a fine cricketer, that when players touch one another (appropriately - no funny business) there is a greater feeling of camaraderie amongst us. We feel that we are part of the unit. That's what in the developmental psychology of children that nurturing aspect is so important. I'm partial to this team bonding issue and I feel that it's a terrific tonic to g'ing up the spirits of players. Kudos for the article and well written.

Jeremy Stersky -

Bingo Room player and founder

Amy Wilson

Bob - there have been also been a few posts floating through the blogosphere re: the value of hugging http://bit.ly/g4mkNz by Kris Dunn, Trish McFarlane, etc.

It seems to me that there is a general sense that touch/hugging is instrumental in building trust. Meanwhile, trust is the key to success in the social economy (per folks like John Hagel). What I wonder is where this leaves us in a virtual, social economy? We can simulate so many things, but can we really simulate that vulnerability that comes with physically connecting to another individual? Or will we see a sudden rise in live conference attendance? :)

davidburkus

P.S. Darn. I was hoping this could be a decent excuse. ; )

Dave

It seems like a chicken-egg question to me. Do players who touch more win more or do they touch more because they are winning more?

The talk about team culture, a team "gelling", a team feeling like a bunch of brothers...these statements are made about teams that are often playing very well and it is suggested that the success is due to the camaraderie. They probably have much higher incidences of touching, but it could simply be the by-product of their personal feelings about each other and their shared success. The key test would be to measure the rate of touching for teams that are winning if and when they begin to lose. If the Lakers or Celtics are high-touch, will they continue to be if they are not in the NBA Finals regularly? Also, is the touching really just a by-product of a few, positive people? What happens if the Celtics enter decline and their star players retire or move in via free agency? Does the touching "culture" evaporate? Would simply finding a player who touches more lead to more wins at that point?

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