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Jan

Just wanted to share this websit:
http://www.bayareanewsgroup.com/multimedia/mn/biz/overview.htm

It's where the CEOs of Silicon Valley earned their degrees. I thought it would be much more MBAs, but as it turned out, a lot have a degree in Electrical Engineering. Interesting.

Creighton Chun

It seems to me that the theories of "The psychology of lines" are rather vauge and general. Perhaps the rules of line Etiquette would be far more interesting.

tercume

Many of the characteristics you cite remind me of the wait for admission to the "Festival of Lessons and Carols" on Christmas Eve at King's College Cambridge. The College is very good about communicating the wait, the timing is well-known, and there is a perception among the group that it is worth waiting for. The queue usually closes at around 10:00a for the 4:00p service, since everyone knows that the Chapel can only accommodate a certain number of people. Once in the queue, members of the choir will sometimes come around and sing, and you are allowed to hold a place for one other person, meaning that you can have a portion of your group take a stroll through the town or bring back a bracing cup of tea.

Phil

You're right that David Maister's article hasn't lost a bit of it's spark. And if there's a better article on the subject, I haven't read it!

Oddly, although I use the article regularly in my undergrad teaching, the last time I referred to it was at a recent faculty meeting on how to improve the student experience during enrolment. At one point I relayed some complaints I'd had from damp freshers, about having to queue in the rain. One of our senior management team declared "I had to queue in the rain so why shouldn't they?"

At the time I referred him to Maister's theories, although in hindsight I missed a golden opportunity to introduce the No Asshole Rule into the discussion. I guess there's always next year!

cbooker

Many of the characteristics you cite remind me of the wait for admission to the "Festival of Lessons and Carols" on Christmas Eve at King's College Cambridge. The College is very good about communicating the wait, the timing is well-known, and there is a perception among the group that it is worth waiting for. The queue usually closes at around 10:00a for the 4:00p service, since everyone knows that the Chapel can only accommodate a certain number of people. Once in the queue, members of the choir will sometimes come around and sing, and you are allowed to hold a place for one other person, meaning that you can have a portion of your group take a stroll through the town or bring back a bracing cup of tea.

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