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Todd Rhoad

This is an interesting article. Learning is hard work and requires thinking. Most people can't do that day after day. So, as Mr. Webster indicated, people simply avoid dissonant cognitives.

What it would be like to create an organizational culture that would drive such mindsets? The world would be a different place.

Chris Young

Great post Bob, and an important application of Dweck's work indeed.

I've chosen your post to be featured in my top five blog picks for the past week which can be found here: http://www.maximizepossibility.com/employee_retention/2008/09/the-rainmaker-f.html

Be well!

Nathan Stehle

Michael Webster...read the article and then see what you think. This area is obviously complex, and I do not think the authors present their work in an absolutist manner.

Nathan Stehle

Here's a link on employees that Wally Bock calls one of the five best as well:

http://www.thehappyemployee.com/2008/08/employees-are-necessary-evil.html

Very interesting...if you have a very harsh, myopic view of the world.

CV Harquail

At least for now, a pdf of the Heslin & Vandewalle article can be accessed at :
http://pheslin.cox.smu.edu/documents/Managers%27_Implicit_Assumptions_about_Personnel.pdf

Good to know if you are not an academic and/or a person with free access to online jnl articles

Wally Bock

Congratulations! This post was selected as one of the five best business blog posts of the week in my Three Star Leadership Midweek Review of the Business Blogs.

http://blog.threestarleadership.com/2008/08/27/82708-a-midweek-look-at-the-business-blogs.aspx

Wally Bock

michael webster

Bob, isn't hard to believe that this experiment shows anything more than standard cognitive dissonance?

You ask me to state a position: I choose to state that mental capacities are fixed.

You show me some counter-examples, and I refuse to budge.

What does it matter what the content of the counter-examples is?

Once I have stated my position, I am going to downgrade evidence against it.

Is there anything more to this set of experiments? And if not, surely we can construct the opposite effect: where people state that the mental is not fixed and refuse to accept evidence showing that it is.

Erika with Qvisory

This is fascinating! I like the possibilities is presents for managers with fixed mindsets. Just think of all the great work they could be missing!

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