Book Me For A Speech

My Writing and Ranting

Press Room

Good Books

« Reality Check: Guy Kawasaki's Magical New Book | Main | Up The Organization: A Timeless Classic »

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Nils Davis

"Although efficiency and innovation are two words that often seem at odds -- there do seem to be ways and times when ideas can be developed, spread, and implemented in efficient ways."

Let's hope this counter-intuitive concept *does* apply to getting us out of the economic mess we're in. My particular area of interest (see my blog) is energy independence and green energy. Most analysis says that it's cost-effective (actually profitable) and the IPCC says we have to do it. Conclusion: the investment will be good for the economy, and is low risk.

But it's perceived as costly, unnecessary, and in particular, time-consuming. Just like fixing the medical system. I'm hoping for a visionary group like IHI to come along to drive this.

Jim Waller

Bob,

I really enjoyed the article, thanks for sharing it with us. I think it really illustrates how innovation based on a small framework can have a HUGE impact. I think that in addition to the "ergonomics" of the implementation, there was certainly an "ergonomics of emotion" that helped the implementation and success of the project, because the goal was to save lives.
Clearly, a factor of innovation is the emotional investment of the participants, which is why making the suggested processes easy to understand and easy to implement led to more participation.

I found the article very interesting. Thanks.

Jim Waller

Mary Pat Whaley

In 2006, I was VP of a rural hospital and was privileged to be a very small part of the 100,000 lives campaign. In that same year I was admitted to the hospital and my life was saved by a rapid response team when I stopped breathing. I agree that the IHI project demonstrates the ergonomics of innovation, although I didn't realize it until I read your article. It is often difficult to feel positive while working in the US healthcare system, but there are amazing things being done daily across the country by people who care deeply about the welfare of others.
Great job!
Mary Pat Whaley
www.managemypractice.com

The comments to this entry are closed.

Asshole Survival

Scaling Up

Good Boss Bad Boss

No Asshole Rule

Hard Facts

Weird Ideas

Knowing -Doing Gap

The No Asshole Rule:Articles and Stories